Walking

Walking


                                    Walking
| 5 min
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Animator Ryan Larkin uses an artist's sensibility to illustrate the way people walk. He employs a variety of techniques--line drawing, colour wash, etc.--to catch and reproduce the motion of people afoot. The springing gait of youth, the mincing step of the high-heeled female, the doddering amble of the elderly--all are registered with humour and individuality, to the accompaniment of special sound. Without words.

Walking would earn Ryan Larkin an Oscar® nomination in the category of short animated film. Using a variety of techniques, Larkin transformed the ordinary action of people walking into a study of the beauty of the human body.

Albert Ohayon
From the playlist: The 1960s: An Explosion of Creativity

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Credits
  • director
    Ryan Larkin
  • producer
    Ryan Larkin
  • animation
    Ryan Larkin
  • animation camera
    Raymond Dumas
    William Wiggins
  • music
    David Fraser
    Pat Patterson
    Christopher Nutter

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  • Scarletpimpernel76

    Very Nice...

    Scarletpimpernel76, 5 Nov 2013
  • nikkity

    Breathtaking. Wit and whimsy and artistry all rolled up into a visual delight.

    nikkity, 1 Feb 2012
  • willychyr

    What a beautiful film. I must have watched this piece at least 50 times by now, and I still find it mesmerizing. The movements are so liberating, and I love the way the colours shift from frame to frame.

    willychyr, 27 Dec 2010
  • Edward Westerhuis

    My favorite one is at 3:15 where the woman runs across the screen, left to right. It's as if the paint splatters on each forceful step and doesn't reach her backside. I don't know how else to explain it.

    Edward Westerhuis, 16 Feb 2010