The NFB is committed to respecting your privacy

We use cookies to ensure that our site works efficiently, as well as for advertising purposes.

If you do not wish to have your information used in this way, you can modify your browser settings before continuing your visit.

Learn more
Skip to content
Your request could not be processed.
Playlists
Please note that you can no longer create or edit a playlist. Learn more.
Access your playlists

Embed this code on your site

Video player width

by Reset
New release
Coming 
None

T.V. Tango

1992 3 min
Leaving soon

Four children who have picked up all sorts of annoying behavior from watching television decide instead to create their own games. This animated film for five- to eight-year-olds is intended to awaken children's critical sense regarding the media messages aimed at them. (Film without words).

We're sorry, this content is not available in your location.
Your rental expires on
None
You've already purchased this film.
Download it from My purchases.
Not available
Campus
T.V. Tango
  • Children First!
    Children First!
    1996 7 films
    Fifty years ago, a boat left New York with a cargo of powdered milk for the hungry children of post-war Europe. It was the first undertaking of the UN's International Children's Emergency Fund. Initially conceived as a short-term measure, UNICEF went on to become a leading world advocate for children's welfare and is commemorating its 50th anniversary this year. Children First! showcases award-winning NFB shorts dealing with children's rights and the UN's Convention on the Rights of the Child. Diane Chartrand's The Orange is a touching tale of how children help a hungry classmate. Janet Perlman's Dinner for Two is a light-hearted lesson in conflict resolution, and Eugene Fedorenko's Oscar-winning Every Child is an engaging reflection on every child's right to a name and nationality. Rounding out the selection are Michèle Cournoyer's An Artist a beautifully rendered story of a parent's awakening to his young daughter's potential abilities, and Martine Chartrand's TV Tango, a comic critique of mass media and its impact on children. Francine Desbiens's To See the World is a fitting tale of a boy who witnesses the suffering of the world's children through a train window, and envisions solutions which ensure happy, healthy children everywhere. Finally, a child's right to a future in which dreams may be fulfilled is examined in Why? by Brestislav Pojar.

Suggestions

Details

Four children who have picked up all sorts of annoying behavior from watching television decide instead to create their own games. This animated film for five- to eight-year-olds is intended to awaken children's critical sense regarding the media messages aimed at them. (Film without words).
  • director
    Martine Chartrand
  • script
    Martine Chartrand
  • animation
    Martine Chartrand
  • producer
    Thérèse Descary
  • cinematography
    Jacques Avoine
  • sound
    Sherly Desbiens
    Luc Papineau
  • editing
    Suzanne Allard
  • sound editing
    Gilles Quintal
  • voice
    Sylvie Dumontier
    Brigitte Poudrier
    Martine Chartrand
    Germain Larochelle
    Marie Larochelle
  • music
    Denis Larochelle

Enjoy the NFB experience on your favourite device.