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Nimmikaage (Elle danse pour son peuple)

Nimmikaage (Elle danse pour son peuple)

| 3 min

Le court métrage Nimmikaage (Elle danse pour son peuple) de Michelle Latimer est un requiem pour les femmes autochtones du Canada. Le film déconstruit couche par couche l’affectation attestée du nationalisme canadien.


Credits
  • direction
    Michelle Latimer
  • producer
    Anita Lee
  • executive producer
    Anita Lee
  • editor
    Roslyn Kalloo
  • delegate producer
    Kate Vollum
  • None
    Tanya Tagaq
    Anna Pardo Canedo
    Serena Lee
    Antonia Gueorguieva
    Jean Coulombe
    Pascal Vincent
    Aldo La Ricca
    William Holley
  • song - publisher
    Tanya Tagaq
    Anna Pardo Canedo
  • production supervisor
    Mark Wilson
  • technical lead
    Marcus Matyas
  • editing assistant
    Tiffany Beaudin
    Zoya Rezaie
  • studio administrator
    Stefanie Brantner
  • production coordinator
    Jennifer Bertling
    Andrew Martin-Smith
  • marketing
    Melissa Wheeler
  • publicity
    Jennifer Mair
  • title design
    Sébastien Aubin
  • titles design
    Sébastien Aubin
  • online editing
    Laura Aqui
  • post-production services
    Fearless Films
  • stock footage
    Fred Savard
    Ragnhild Milewski
    Josée Riopel

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Education

Ages 16 to 18

Indigenous Studies - Arts
Indigenous Studies - History/Politics
Indigenous Studies - Identity/Society
Indigenous Studies - Issues and Contemporary Challenges

This short film can be used to prompt discussions and research in relation to Indigenous women’s legacy throughout Canada’s colonial history. How can contrasting sounds and images tell a powerful story or evoke emotion? What feelings does this contrast evoke?  How does this short film address Indigenous identity and representation? Explain how this film reframes Canadian history through a contemporary lens. How do the visuals and soundscape deconstruct layers of Canadian nationalism?

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