Kindergarten

This short documentary focuses on one day in a kindergarten classroom. We watch the teacher encouraging children to turn their curiosity into questions and organizing group activities and play periods. Filmed at Van Horne Public School in Montreal.

Comments

  • CapnLance

    “I enjoyed watching this film for very selfish reasons. This is my kindergarten class and Mrs Sharp my kindergarten teacher. I'm not in this film because as I recall the day was split into two classes, but this is my 1962 kindergarten class. Seing Mrs.Sharp playing her piano brought shivers down my spine.” — CapnLance, 4 Jun 2012

  • smarti

    “I really enjoyed viewing this film. I trained as a Kindergtarten teacher in the Froebel method in the UK in the 1970s. Since then I have been a teacher of young children and college professor in early childhood subjects - in the UK and here in Canada. One of my interests is in observing children and I have written books on this subject. This film has many opportunities for teachers and learners to observe children and I will recommend it. Hopefully it will be accessible to readers of my text when I mention it in the next edition of Take a Look: Observation and Portfolio Assessment in Early Childhood 6th edition Pearson Canada. Athough some practices have changed since the making of this film and there is an interesting structure within the classroom, the children appear very confident and appreciate what is expected of them. It seems as though the children have play opportunities that we have denied our Kindergarten children in recent years. If only politicians and policy-makers could see what the children were learnign through this play they might see the value of reinforcing it in their curriculum documents. Having curriculum program standards or other requirements such as learning outcomes that must be achieved at the end of a program frightens teachers away from offering a play-based prpgram. If teachers were to trust in their children's natural ability to play, discover, explore and learn, they would then drop the prescriptive methods they clutch onto for fear that the standards will not be achieved. Watch the film, observe the children, and even if for only a few minutes, see how they learn! IT may be 1962 and the contexts, times and pressures may have changed but children remain fundamentally the same.” — smarti, 21 Aug 2011

Discuss this film Please sign in to add your comment
Not a member ? Click here

Film Credits

director
Guy L. Coté
editing
Guy L. Coté
producer
Tom Daly
photography
Georges Dufaux
sound
Marcel Carrière
sound editing
Sidney Pearson
re-recording
Ron Alexander

Find Similar Films