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An Artist

1994 5 min
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In this short animation, a girl is so carried away by her love of music that she forgets about her household chores. Her father tells her to finish the dishes. Instead of washing them, she turns them into musical instruments, and he finally recognizes her talent. Based on Article 29 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, this film illustrates children's right to develop their talents and abilities to their fullest potential.

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An Artist
  • Children First!
    Children First!
    1996 7 films
    Fifty years ago, a boat left New York with a cargo of powdered milk for the hungry children of post-war Europe. It was the first undertaking of the UN's International Children's Emergency Fund. Initially conceived as a short-term measure, UNICEF went on to become a leading world advocate for children's welfare and is commemorating its 50th anniversary this year. Children First! showcases award-winning NFB shorts dealing with children's rights and the UN's Convention on the Rights of the Child. Diane Chartrand's The Orange is a touching tale of how children help a hungry classmate. Janet Perlman's Dinner for Two is a light-hearted lesson in conflict resolution, and Eugene Fedorenko's Oscar-winning Every Child is an engaging reflection on every child's right to a name and nationality. Rounding out the selection are Michèle Cournoyer's An Artist a beautifully rendered story of a parent's awakening to his young daughter's potential abilities, and Martine Chartrand's TV Tango, a comic critique of mass media and its impact on children. Francine Desbiens's To See the World is a fitting tale of a boy who witnesses the suffering of the world's children through a train window, and envisions solutions which ensure happy, healthy children everywhere. Finally, a child's right to a future in which dreams may be fulfilled is examined in Why? by Brestislav Pojar.

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In this short animation, a girl is so carried away by her love of music that she forgets about her household chores. Her father tells her to finish the dishes. Instead of washing them, she turns them into musical instruments, and he finally recognizes her talent. Based on Article 29 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, this film illustrates children's right to develop their talents and abilities to their fullest potential.
  • director
    Michèle Cournoyer
  • script
    Michèle Cournoyer
  • animation
    Michèle Cournoyer
  • producer
    Thérèse Descary
  • camera
    François Beauchemin
    Séraphin Bouchard
  • editing
    Werner Nold
    France Pilon
  • re-recording
    Jean-Pierre Joutel
    Serge Boivin
  • music
    Ginette Bellavance
    Daniel Toussaint
  • cast
    Paule Brouillard
    André Brouillard
    Vincent Brouillard

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Education

Ages 8 to 12

This wordless short film is part of the Rights from the Heart series, emphasizing a child’s right to education based on the development of the child’s personality, talents and abilities to their full potential. The girl in the film is expected to help with chores, but she is distracted by her wish to create music. Her father seems frustrated by her lack of focus until he hears the music she creates. Students can discuss the child and parent’s point of view. Whose responsibility is it to help a child reach their full potential? Do parents favour some talents more than others? Does a talent always lead to a career?  What talents are you developing?