Naomi Klein's Playlist of Films about the Environment

Naomi Klein's Playlist of Films about the Environment

The NFB has a long tradition of producing documentaries that investigate the complex relationship between the economy and our deteriorating environment. To accompany the Virtual Lecture that happened on September 28, 2016, Naomi Klein has curated a playlist of NFB films that look at the impact of corporate decisions on the environment and celebrate the inspiring responses of communities in Canada and around the world.

  • Being Caribou

    In this feature-length documentary, husband and wife team Karsten Heuer (wildlife biologist) and Leanne Allison (environmentalist) follow a herd of 120,000 caribou on foot across 1500 km of Arctic tundra. In following the herd's migration, the couple hopes to raise awareness of the threats to the caribou's survival. Along the way they brave Arctic weather, icy rivers, hordes of mosquitoes and a very hungry grizzly bear. Dramatic footage and video diaries combine to provide an intimate perspective of an epic expedition.

  • Cafeteria
    campus 2015 | 24 min

    This short documentary looks at how an entire community mobilized to improve the cafeteria menu at a primary school in Cocagne, New Brunswick. Rallying behind this noble cause, residents put their shoulder to the wheel, promoting products from local farmers over those of multinational corporations. Everyone gets involved to make healthy eating a common goal as well as a learning opportunity.

    This film was made as part of the Tremplin program, in collaboration with Radio-Canada.

  • Worst Case Scenario
    2001|43 min

    This documentary looks at the risks of a proposed sour gas well near Clearwater River, in Rocky Mountain House, Alberta. Farmers and landowners all share concerns. Residents opposed to the well fear a deadly hydrogen sulphide leak. Shell Canada says it must drill to meet energy needs. When mediation talks break down, both sides anxiously await a ruling from Alberta's Energy and Utilities Board.

  • Our Nationhood
    2003|1 h 36 min

    In this feature documentary, Aboriginal filmmaker and artist Alanis Obomsawin chronicles the determination and tenacity of the Listuguj Mi'gmaq people to use and manage the natural resources of their traditional lands. Our Nationhood provides a contemporary perspective on the Mi'gmaq people's ongoing struggle and ultimate success, culminating in the community receiving an award for Best Managed River from the same government that had denied their traditional rights.

  • The Take
    2004|1 h 27 min

    The Take is a political thriller that turns the globalization debate on its head. The film follows Argentina's radical new movement of occupied businesses: groups of workers who are claiming the country's bankrupt workplaces and running them without bosses. With The Take, director Avi Lewis, one of Canada's most outspoken journalists, and writer Naomi Klein, author of the international bestseller No Logo, champion a radical economic manifesto for the 21st century. But what shines through in the film is the simple drama of workers lives and their struggles: the demand for dignity and the searing injustice of dignity denied.

  • Weather Report
    2007|52 min

    For many people, global warming is something happening somewhere else to somebody else, but for millions, it is right at their doorstep. This film journeys across the globe, from the Canadian Arctic to northern Kenya, from the U.S. Midwest to China and India, visiting communities where lives and livelihoods are being affected in dramatic ways.

    Putting a face to the reality of global warming illuminates the impact of recent climate change, delivering a new perspective to audiences worldwide. The question is no longer whether climate change is happening, but whether we can respond to the emergency before it's too late.


  • The Hole Story

    In this feature documentary, Richard Desjardins and Robert Monderie continue in the same provocative vein as their earlier Forest Alert, this time turning their lens on Canada's mining industry. Using striking images, rare archival footage and interviews, The Hole Story analyzes company profits and the impact of mining on the environment and workers’ health.

  • Marilyn Waring on the Environment Show Three
    1996|26 min

    Marilyn Waring, ex-MP in the New Zealand Parliament and spokesperson for global feminist economics, now lives and works on her farm in the lush green hills of New Zealand. While in office, Waring fought to preserve the priceless natural resources of her riding, drawing on the pragmatic wisdom of her neighbours--farmers whose livelihoods depend on sustainable land use, and the Maori, who have lived in harmony with their environment for countless generations. Waring makes a convincing argument for changing a system that does not value what may be our most precious assets: clean air, water, and the unspoiled ecosystems that sustain and enrich life on earth.