International Holocaust Remembrance Day

Watch the playlist

About this playlist

This playlist compiles a selection of valuable learning resources, including several NFB films and sources provided by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, UNESCO, the USC Shoah Foundation and Holocaust education centres throughout Canada. These resources offer secondary-school educators the opportunity to discover new approaches to teaching about the Holocaust and the many lessons it offers on human rights, racism, democratic values, intercultural understanding, citizenship and genocide prevention.

Some of the films in this playlist are available to CAMPUS users only. Your ministry of education or school board may have already purchased a subscription to CAMPUS for you. Please click on the following links to check whether your organization already has a subscription or to purchase a subscription for yourself or for your school

NFB FILMS ABOUT THE HOLOCAUST AND ITS LEGACY

The Basketball Game

Behind the Swastika: Nazi Atrocities

I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors

Memorandum

TO LEARN MORE

Visit the sites below to explore resources that will get your students engaged with this subject matter:

RESOURCES COMPILED BY HOLOCAUST EXPERT DR. CARSON PHILLIPS AND HISTORY TEACHER SCOTT MASTERS

Oral History Project – Scott Masters, Crestwood Preparatory College, Toronto, ON

Under the leadership of Scott Masters, students at Crestwood Preparatory College have interviewed almost 200 Holocaust survivors on video. Their stories teach important lessons about hope, survival and humanity, encouraging students to stand up against hate and to do good work within their own communities.

crestwood.on.ca/ohp-type/holocaust-survivors/

A comprehensive list of Holocaust teaching resources

Compiled by Dr. Carson Phillips, Assistant Director of the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre.

holocaustcentre.com/Educators-Students/Online-Resources

OTHER RELATED RESOURCES

IWitness

Created by USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education, this website features more than 1,300 video testimonies of Holocaust survivors. It enables learners to see and hear the personal stories of individuals who survived genocide and rebuilt their lives.

iwitness.usc.edu/SFI/

“Why Teach about the Holocaust?”

UNESCO believes that it is essential to learn about the Holocaust to better understand the causes of Europe’s descent into genocide; the subsequent development of international law and institutions designed to prevent and punish genocide; and that the careful comparison with other examples of mass violence may contribute to the prevention of future genocides and mass atrocities.

en.unesco.org/publications/why-teach-about-holocaust-pdf-1

The Azrieli Foundation

The Azrieli Foundation publishes memoirs of Holocaust survivors who later made their way to Canada. The program is guided by the conviction that such stories play an important role in education about tolerance and diversity. Each story is a unique first-person account that demonstrates the courage, strength and luck it took to survive such terrible adversity. The stories are also moving tributes to people who risked their lives to help others. The foundation also produces short videos that teachers can use to introduce the memoirs:

https://vimeo.com/azrieli/videos

Canada’s role in chairing the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance

“The Holocaust is a crime that stands alone in human history for the scale of its horror and inhumanity. That is why it is crucial to ensure that this experience is never forgotten and that such atrocities never take place again”. – Jason Kenney, Minister for Multiculturalism Canada has invested significantly in Holocaust education, remembrance and research.

cic.gc.ca/english/multiculturalism/holocaust.asp

“Enemy Aliens”: The Internment of Jewish Refugees in Canada, 1940–43

As Nazi Germany drew the world into war, Canada’s discriminatory immigration policies denied entry to those seeking refuge, particularly Jews. In 1940, when Canada agreed to Britain’s request to aid the war effort by taking in “enemy aliens” and prisoners of war, it did not expect to also receive 2,284 refugees from Nazism, most of them Jews.Through testimony and artefacts, this virtual exhibit by the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre illustrates a little-known chapter of Canadian history—the story of Canada and the interned refugees. The website features a comprehensive lesson plan for teachers.

enemyaliens.ca/