Okanagan Dreams


This short documentary follows the migration of thousands of young Quebecers as they travel to British Columbia to harvest fruit in the lush Okanagan Valley. The camera follows several spirited youth into the orchards for seven weeks. As the rain sets in, reality unfolds: it's cold, the cherry crop is late, and money is short. But as they make friends and enjoy their independence, the promise of adventure is realized. Although their work is integral to the local economy, the youth find that the experience is not just about making money. It's about awareness, self-discovery and exploring the world.

Who in their 20s hasn’t dreamt of going away for the summer to work somewhere exotic? In this sunny film we follow several young Quebeckers as they go pick fruit in British Columbia. It is Shangri-la for them, as most have never set foot outside of Quebec. The chance to live an adventure away from their parents for the first time brings the young people to the various farms to pick fruit, make friends and create lasting memories. One of the characters best sums it up when he says that working in the Okanagan Valley with the mountains surrounding him is so much better than being stuck in an office in Montreal. I guarantee that this film will put a smile on your face.

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Who in their 20s hasn’t dreamt of going away for the summer to work somewhere exotic? In this sunny film we follow several young Quebeckers as they go pick fruit in British Columbia. It is Shangri-la for them, as most have never set foot outside of Quebec. The chance to live an adventure away from their parents for the first time brings the young people to the various farms to pick fruit, make friends and create lasting memories. One of the characters best sums it up when he says that working in the Okanagan Valley with the mountains surrounding him is so much better than being stuck in an office in Montreal. I guarantee that this film will put a smile on your face.

— Albert Ohayon