Engaging All Voices through Media

Engaging All Voices through Media

Created to mark Media Literacy Week, this rich selection of films examines the role of media in various aspects of contemporary life. Covering an array of topics, such as the politics of gender, class, and race identity, and the challenges of online social relationships and expression, the playlist assembles the inspiring stories of individuals from every corner of the globe who owe their survival to their creative use of media.

  • Angry Inuk
    campus 2016 | 1 h 22 min

    In her award-winning documentary, director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril joins a new tech-savvy generation of Inuit as they campaign to challenge long-established perceptions of seal hunting. Armed with social media and their own sense of humour and justice, this group is bringing its own voice into the conversation and presenting themselves to the world as a modern people in dire need of a sustainable economy.

  • World In a City
    2016|13 min

    World in a City is a portrait of Toronto and the steps Torontonians are taking to create a society that welcomes and encourages new immigrants to flourish. Join photographer Colin Boyd Shafer as he celebrates diversity in this short film, Canada’s contribution to the Big Cities project, an exciting international collaboration that uses documentary storytelling to outline both the challenges facing growing urban areas and the bold solutions to these ongoing problems. To view more of the films, visit LinkTV (here).

  • Social Me
    2015|23 min

    This short documentary examines the role of social media in the lives of teenagers. To the younger generation, social media is more than just a communication tool: it’s a way of life, a sphere in which to explore and create their own universes -- often at the expense of face-to-face interaction. As young Nya enters adulthood, she takes a critical look at how social media has impacted and continues to influence the shaping of her identity, experiences and values.

    This film was made as part of the Tremplin program, in collaboration with Radio-Canada.

  • Monsieur Pug
    2014|9 min

    Who is Monsieur Pug? Why, a dog with bad cholesterol and high blood pressure! And a dog who loves his pie and ice cream. Who relaxes by making origami. In other words, definitely not your ordinary pooch! For he’s also a paranoiac, convinced he’s the target in a vast conspiracy, and pretending to be a pet, the better to hide from his pursuers. Schizoid, perhaps? Hmm… but is Monsieur Pug even a real dog to begin with?

    A delirious fable about a particular brand of modern madness—that brought on by the omnipresence of smartphones in our lives—Monsieur Pug is directed with verve by Janet Perlman, whose The Tender Tale of Cinderella Penguin was nominated for an Academy Award as Best Animated Short in 1982.

    Monsieur Pug is one strange film about the life of one strange dog!

    Want to play a game inspired by Monsieur Pug? Download the FREE app Where's Monsieur Pug? (a FRIMA production) here:
    iOS http://bit.ly/MrPugiOs
    Android http://bit.ly/MrPugGoogle

  • Burma VJ: Reporting from a Closed Country
    2008|1 h 29 min

    Going beyond the occasional news clip from Burma, Burma VJ brings us close to Burma’s video journalists who insist on keeping up the flow of news from their closed country despite risking torture and life in jail. Armed with small handycams they make their undercover reportages, smuggle the material out of the country, have it broadcast back into Burma via satellite and offered as free usage for international media.

  • InRealLife
    campus 2013 | 1 h 25 min

    InRealLife asks what exactly is the internet and what is it doing to our children? Taking us on a journey from the bedrooms of British teenagers to the world of Silicon Valley, filmmaker Beeban Kidron suggests that rather than the promise of free and open connectivity, young people are increasingly ensnared in a commercial world. Beguiling and glittering on the outside, it can be alienating and addictive. Quietly building its case, InRealLife asks if we can afford to stand by while our children, trapped in their 24/7 connectivity, are being outsourced to the net?

  • Everything Will Be
    campus 2013 | 1 h 25 min

    This feature documentary by Sundance award-winning director Julia Kwan captures the subtle nuances of a culturally diverse neighbourhood—Vancouver’s once-thriving Chinatown—in the midst of a transformation that plays out across many ethnic enclaves in North America. The community’s oldest and newest members offer their intimate perspectives on the shifting landscape as they reflect on change, memory and legacy. Night and day, a neon sign that reads “EVERYTHING IS GOING TO BE ALRIGHT” looms over Chinatown. Everything is going to be alright. The big question is—for whom?

  • CBQM
    2009|1 h 6 min

    This full-length documentary pays tribute to CBQM, the radio station that operates out of Fort McPherson, a small town about 150 km north of the Arctic Circle in the Canadian Northwest Territories. Through storytelling and old-time country music, filmmaker and long-time listener Dennis Allen crafts a nuanced portrait of the “Moccasin Telegraph,” the radio station that is a pillar of local identity and pride in this lively northern Teetl'it Gwich'in community of 800 souls.

  • Almost Real: Connecting in a Wired World
    2002|47 min

    This documentary presents a few individuals for whom the Internet has become a way to connect with like-minded souls in surprising ways: a cyber punk based on an anti-aircraft rig in the English Channel who operates a rogue Web server, a monk developing "wireless prayer technology," a "gamer" who re-creates himself in an online game, a retired couple living in an Internet-controlled seniors' complex and a divorcée who exchanges vows online with a man she's never met.

  • RiP! A Remix Manifesto
    2008|1 h 26 min

    Join filmmaker Brett Gaylor and mashup artist Girl Talk as they explore copyright and content creation in the digital age. In the process they dissect the media landscape of the 21st century and shatter the wall between users and producers. Creative Commons founder, Lawrence Lessig, Brazil's Minister of Culture, Gilberto Gil, and pop culture critic Cory Doctorow also come along for the ride.

  • Tying Your Own Shoes
    campus 2009 | 3 min

    Tying Your Own Shoes is an intimate glimpse into the exceptional mindsets and emotional lives of four adult artists with Down Syndrome. An artful, four-way essay about ability, this animated documentary explores how it feels to be a little bit unusual.

    In her follow-up to her award-winning film, John and Michael, filmmaker Shira Avni pursues a deeper understanding of esteem and disability by inviting Petra, Matthew, Daninah and Katherine to consider their pasts, relationships and ambitions. Tying Your Own Shoes is a hybrid of auteur documentary and animation cinema, two forms with which The National Film Board of Canada has developed a world-renowned expertise over the past 70 years.