#RockYourMocs (Ages 12+)

#RockYourMocs (Ages 12+)

What do moccasins mean to you? They have a unique association, for instance, for J’net Ayayqwayaksheelth, our new Director of Indigenous Relations and Community Engagement. When faced with some health issues, she once had one of her urban Aunties tell her to “Walk in beauty, and don’t forget to wear pretty slippers.”

Every year on November 15, Indigenous Peoples participate in #RockYourMocs, a social media campaign aimed at honouring their ancestors, their crafts, their cultures, and their nations worldwide. #RockYourMocs promotes crafts and art, and showcases the boundless talents of distinct, living, Indigenous cultures.

The NFB has made an institutional commitment to advance authentic Indigenous voices, and in honour of #RockYourMocs, we’ve put together a playlist of Indigenous-made films that focus on the cultural pride and crafts of Indigenous Peoples in Canada.

  • Now Is the Time
    2019|16 min

    When internationally renowned Haida carver Robert Davidson was only 22 years old, he carved the first new totem pole on British Columbia’s Haida Gwaii in almost a century. On the 50th anniversary of the pole’s raising, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter steps easily through history to revisit that day in August 1969, when the entire village of Old Massett gathered to celebrate the event that would signal the rebirth of the Haida spirit.

  • Vistas: Button Blanket

    This short impressionist documentary looks at the creation of a Button Blanket by integrating the performance of a traditional dance with the art of the West Coast Heiltsuk Nation.

    Vistas is a series of 13 short films on nationhood from 13 Indigenous filmmakers from Halifax to Vancouver. It was a collaborative project between the NFB and APTN to bring Indigenous perspectives and stories to an international audience.

  • Basket
    1975|7 min

    A series of still images follows master Stl’atl’imx (Líl̓wat) basket maker Mathilda Jim, from the harvesting of materials to the creation of a functional work of art. Told in the Lil̓wat7úl language, this short documentary evokes the powerful connection between language, knowledge and culture.

    This short is part of the L’il’wata series. In the early 1970s, at the outset of her documentary career, Alanis Obomsawin visited the Stl’atl’imx (Líl̓wat) Nation, an Interior Salish First Nation in British Columbia, and created a series of shorts that provide personal narratives about their culture, histories and knowledge.

  • Kwa'nu'te': Micmac and Maliseet Artists

    This film profiles a number of Mi’kmaq and Maliseet artists from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, showing their similarities and differences, samples of their work and the sources of their inspiration. It offers a remarkable look at Indigenous art and spirituality in Atlantic Canada.

  • Hands of History
    1994|51 min

    In this acclaimed 1994 documentary, Loretta Todd, a leading figure in Indigenous cinema in Canada, profiles four contemporary female artists—Doreen Jensen, Rena Point Bolton, Jane Ash Poitras and Joane Cardinal-Schubert—who seek to find a continuum from traditional to contemporary forms of expression. Each artist reveals her practice and journey in her own words. The film is a moving testimony to the vital role Indigenous women play in nurturing Indigenous cultures.

  • The Canoe
    1972|5 min

    Utilizing engineering ingenuity that is centuries old, Atikamekw elders Agatha and Cézar Néwashish build a small-scale version of a birch-bark canoe. With their expert hands, a stunning work of art is created.

    This short is part of the Manawan series directed by Alanis Obomsawin

  • Snowshoes
    1978|7 min

    The remarkable construction of the venerable snowshoe is demonstrated from start to finish. Atikamekw Elders Mariane and Athanas Jacob take us into the forest to select the tree that will become a fresh new pair of snowshoes.

    This short is part of the Manawan series directed by Alanis Obomsawin

  • First Stories - Patrick Ross
    2006|5 min

    In this short film, we meet 29-year-old Patrick Ross, an ex-prison inmate-turned-artist. Watch Patrick as he creates one of his extraordinary paintings while sharing his thoughts on his art, his time in jail, and his hopes for the future. First Stories is an emerging filmmaker program for Indigenous youth which produced 3 separate collections of short films from Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Produced in association with CBC, APTN, SCN, SaskFilm and MANITOBA FILM & SOUND.