Expo 67 Live
Expo 67 Live
Expo 67 Live - Relive the show of the century

MORE THAN 18,000 PEOPLE ATTENDED 52 EXPO 67 LIVE SHOWS ON THE ESPLANADE AT MONTREAL’S PLACE DES ARTS IN SEPTEMBER 2017

Expo 67 Live was entirely composed of colourful archival material projected onto giant screens. A unique and innovative installation by artist Karine Lanoie-Brien, this ambitious journey back in time thrilled visitors with its remarkable attention to detail from the “show of the century.”

Relive the spirit of the Expo era through this exclusive selection of NFB films.

Watch Now

Location

EXPO 67 LIVE - PRODUCTION PHOTOS

Discover behind-the-scene images from the production process of Expo 67 Live.

Credits
Creator/writer/director
Karine Lanoie-Brien
Producer
René Chénier
Project manager
Lisa Sfriso
Head researcher
Pascale Bilodeau
Researchers
Geneviève Laforest
Karine Lanoie-Brien
Key advisor, Expo 67
Roger La Roche
Master image editor
Jacquelyn Mills
Design art director
Francis Gélinas
Postproduction coordinator
Michèle Paquin
Sound designer
Jean-Michel Caron
Technical designer, video projection
François David
Set designer
Isabelle Guichard
Onsite installation
Benoît Lemieux, chief consultant
Virginie Simon, operations and production
Editors
Alexandre Chartrand
Karine Lanoie-Brien
Marlène Poulin
Francis Gélinas
Martin Jean
Alexandre Maltais
Technical directors
Bruno Colpron
Félix Dandurand
Eric Gagnon
Music rights clearance
Sébastien Lépine
Archival image clearance
Hélène Dubé
Administration
Isabelle Limoges
Motion designers
Martin Jean
Gabriel Jetté
Jan Verburg
Fabien Dostie
Charly Chives
Carlos Miguel Barrera Alarcon
Philippe Langlois
3D animator
Gaël Jacques
2D animator
Michèle Paquin
Executive producer, Programming and Production, Institutional Program
René Chénier

A National Film Board of Canada production
In collaboration with Radio-Canada and Place des Arts
With the financial contribution of the Government of Quebec as part of the official programming for the 375th Anniversary of Montreal

ONF/NFB
Radio-Canada
Place des arts
Alive 375

REMEMBERING EXPO 67

In 1967, on the eve of one of the biggest universal expositions in history, Montreal was in full cultural, economic, political and social swing. Under the leadership of Mayor Jean Drapeau, the city had undergone massive development, notably the transformation of Île-Notre-Dame and Île-Sainte-Hélène and the opening of the Metro. This redefining of the urban landscape was set against the Quiet Revolution, as Quebec leapt into modernity and opened itself to the Swinging Sixties. Quebeckers embraced the world, women gained emancipation, and we witnessed an incredible creative, scientific and technical boom. If society was rocked by major events—the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the race for space, the Civil Rights movement—Expo 67 embodied a vision of hope, a humanist future, a world of possibilities. In 1967, Montreal set out to meet the world, and the world came to Montreal.

  1. November 13, 1962

    Following the withdrawal of Moscow’s candidacy in April, the 1967 universal exhibition was granted to the city of Montreal.

  2. August 11, 1963

    Official ceremony to launch the construction of the Saint-Helen and Notre-Dame islands. There were only four years left to complete the site before Expo was to open.

  3. September 1963

    The chosen site was questioned, because a computer simulation predicted that the site would not be ready before … 1969.

  4. Night of June 30 to July 1, 1964

    The Night of the Islands: after being built by the City of Montreal, the Expo islands were transferred to the Expo Corporation.

  5. April 28, 1967

    Expo’s official opening ceremony. With more than one million visitors over the weekend, the métro system was swamped.

  6. May 1, 1967

    Predictions of 35 million visitors no longer held: 50 million were expected by the end of October. Organizers rushed to build additional restaurants, install more restrooms overnight, and place hundreds more dustbins and benches throughout the site.

  7. Mid-May 1967

    The amusement park, La Ronde, was so successful that the evening entrance fee was reduced to $1. The Youth Pavilion became a great success, offering a space for creativity, shows and socialization that has remained unmatched.

  8. October 28, 1967

    The 50th million visitor walked through Expo’s turnstiles.

  9. October 29, 1967

    Closure of the most popular universal exhibition of the 20th century

Some NFB films about Expo 67

In the run-up to the launch of Expo 67 Live, rediscover the spirit of the Expo era through an exclusive selection of NFB films.

ARCHIVE PHOTOS OF EXPO 67

Experience the Expo hype with this photo gallery from the 1967 World’s Fair.

Did you know?

NFB Newsletter

Stay up to date on all activities by subscribing to our newsletter.