Pas de deux
Tré Armstrong on dance, music and passion - A selection by Tré Armstrong

Pas de deux

| 13 min
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This Oscar®-nominated short film by Norman McLaren is a cinematic study of the choreography of ballet. A bare, black set with the back-lit figures of dancers Margaret Mercier and Vincent Warren create a dream-like, hypnotic effect. This award-winning film comes complete with the visual effects one expects from this master filmmaker.

This was done before I was even born, and yet I still find the visual effects captivating. Definitely before its time when it was produced and directed. I love the part near the end where the male dancer is spinning the ballerina by one leg and it looks like she is an open umbrella twirling round and round. How clever! Some great moments in movement, imagery and visual effects. I find the marriage between the dancer, movement and the camera hypnotizing… To make this type of film requires patient passion because this is dance made for the camera lens, not for stage, and that is choreography on another level!

Tré Armstrong
From the playlist: Tré Armstrong on dance, music and passion

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Credits
  • director
    Norman McLaren
  • producer
    Norman McLaren
  • photography
    Jacques Fogel
  • choreography
    Ludmilla Chiriaeff

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  • Ajijaak

    Super love!

    Ajijaak, 9 Jul 2016
  • jonasarman

    When art promotes conciousness

    jonasarman, 21 Jan 2016
  • blaineadams@cogeco.ca

    I loved this film when I irst saw it 40 years ago. Loved seeing it again, but was distracted by the prominant NFB logo on the screen, Too bright, too large, too much in the picture. I understand the need for such things, but could it not be more discreet?

    blaineadams@cogeco.ca, 2 Feb 2010