Remember Africville

This short film depicts Africville, a small black settlement that lay within the city limits of Halifax, Nova Scotia. In the 1960s, the families there were uprooted and their homes demolished in the name of urban renewal and integration. More than 20 years later, the site of the community of Africville is a stark, under-utilized park. Former residents, their descendants and some of the decision-makers speak out and, with the help of archival photographs and films, tell the story of that painful relocation.

Pedagogical evaluations and study guides are only available to CAMPUS subscribers.

CAMPUS

Features designed specifically for teachers

Learn more   Already subscribed? Sign in.

Comments

  • ileayan

    “We should be very proud of the fact that although we were stolen and brought to a strange land. And still we formed our own independence from them to ensure or freedom and peace. Not just the cotton fields. You forget they where very selective who they toke from each village in Afrika. Thats why you have over 101 Black Inventers. That made America what it is today. So much credit has not been given to these great people stolen. They where not slaves. They where forced into this situation. So you Afrikans from home that don't want to agree that the so-called negro is not your true brothers and sisters from Afrika, Shame on your thinking. And why is that. Many scholars have proven you wrong. "Divide and Conquer". This is a very uplifting film and should be shown in a Learning Institutions of the World. Nana Obrafo Yaw Asiedu ” — ileayan, 19 Sep 2012

  • Mario

    “When are "we" going to learn that we all are HUMAN BEINGS??? Am ashamed of "us". Aires Mario da Cruz.” — Mario, 15 Mar 2010

Discuss this film Please sign in to add your comment
Not a member ? Click here

Film Credits

director
Shelagh Mackenzie
producer
Daryl Gray
Shelagh Mackenzie
camera
Kent Nason
André Gariépy
sound
Arthur McKay
editing
Shelagh Mackenzie
Kent Nason
Eric Campbell
sound editing
Alex Salter
sound mixer
Howard England
narrator
Delvina Bernard
music
Scott MacMillan

Find Similar Films