Stories from Our Land 1.5: Inngiruti - The Thing that Sings!

Stories from Our Land 1.5: Inngiruti - The Thing that Sings!


                                    Stories from Our Land 1.5: Inngiruti - The Thing that Sings!
| 5 min
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There’s a lot happening in the Arctic. Canadians are talking about environmental, geopolitical, military and cultural issues, and Stories from Our Land: 1.5 adds engaging voices to the discussion. The Stories program gave 6 Nunavut filmmakers the opportunity to create a 5-minute short that followed a couple of key guidelines: Each film had to be made without the use of interviews or narration, and it had to tell a northern story from a northern perspective.

Inngiruti - The Thing That Sings
In Pangnirtung, 2 elders reminisce about the dances held in their community 50 years ago. One of the elders is master accordion player Simeonie Keenainak, and pretty soon he is making toe-tapping music with his instrument. In this celebration of the pleasures of music and dance, Keenainak plays for the enjoyment of friends, family and the community at large.

Filmmaker Nyla Innuksuk lives in Toronto.

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Credits
  • writer
    Nyla Innuksuk
  • director
    Nyla Innuksuk
  • editor
    Nyla Innuksuk
  • cinematographer
    Nyla Innuksuk
  • participant
    Simeonie Keenainak
    Oasaloosie Ishulutak
  • producer
    David Christensen
  • executive producer
    David Christensen

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  • NFB_Moderator

    @Katedu--> I've contacted the producer of the film and he was unable to answer. He did suggest contacting an Inuktituk speaker for the answer. Sorry we couldn't be of more assistance!

    NFB_Moderator, 23 Apr 2015
  • Katedu

    Does the word they are using mean "song" (as in with lyrics) or does it mean "tune"/"melody"? Are there separate words for these two terms in Inuit dialects, the way traditional instrumental musicians who speak English differentiate between them? (The general English-speaking public often uses the word "song" for an instrumental tune, but most musicians I know don't do that.)

    Katedu, 7 Apr 2015