Hi-Ho Mistahey! (Clip)

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In this feature-length documentary, Alanis Obomsawin tells the story of Shannen’s Dream, a national campaign to provide equitable access to education in safe and suitable schools for First Nations children. Strong participation in this initiative eventually brings Shannen's Dream all the way to the United Nations in Geneva.

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Comments

  • babarkhouse

    “The thing I liked the most about this film is that it is made by a member of the community that it is about, which gives it a very honest and relatable feel. The story is of Shannen's Dream of a school in her community. Also the power of children speaking common sense to politicians is always amazing. ” — babarkhouse, 21 Feb 2014

  • ChrisCarruthersAcadiaEd

    “I believe that this film deserves to be taught at any level in the Social Studies, as it promotes engaged citizenship, one of the defining features of the discipline. It is an easy fit into the curriculum at any level and would be a good way to engage youth, by seeing themselves represented as instigators of change in the world. I would consider using this film as a unit opener, to get students thinking about the concept of rights and how the idea of rights can differ depending on where you live or the colour of your skin.” — ChrisCarruthersAcadiaEd, 21 Feb 2014

  • DanJJ

    “This film made with great passion and humility leads people everywhere to continually raise the questions whose answers lead us to doing what is right to have a just, safe human community. The voices of children are powerful, cutting through darkness of ignorance to show us ones again the light of what is good, true and right. Thank you, Shannen.” — DanJJ, 17 Feb 2014

  • AJRCrosbie

    “Inspiring film! On one hand I'm inspired by how any Canadian can effect change within our communities; on the other hand I'm shocked that this isn't an isolated case and the UN had to get involved. Canada, the country that we all love, certainly has some work to do in order to live up to its image. ” — AJRCrosbie, 16 Feb 2014

  • germainecomeau@mac.com

    “I saw this film in a public viewing last week in Church Point NS and looked at it again yesterday. (I was a bit disappointed that the version here is 40 minutes shorter…). The film touched me very deeply and gives an incredibly compassionate insight on First Nations struggles. Alanis is a master filmmaker. I love and admire you all. Thank you so much for your work and determination. One of the best documentaries I have ever seen. ” — germainecomeau@mac.com, 16 Feb 2014

  • muskwa

    “Simply beautiful. Thank you to all who made this possible. Thank you to Shannen and her family, to her community and to all the children and their truthful words. ” — muskwa, 16 Feb 2014

  • KarinLisaAtkinson

    “Beautiful film, heart touching, informative, soul penetrating, made with the love of a powerful filmmaker and woman of inspiring integrity and meaning - Alanis Obomsawin. Thank you to Shannen, Shannen's family and friends for sharing their journey with us. Miigwech” — KarinLisaAtkinson, 15 Feb 2014

  • sierraleone

    “Powerful film-thank you Alanis Obomsawin and the whole team. I continue to be inspired and will share this with the students I teach. Strength in numbers....when people come together many things can be possible. Thank you Shannen for your bravery and courage-for planting the seed of change. It continues to grow......Cindy Blackstock...for your phenomenal-ness and passion. I continue to feel inspired and empowered.” — sierraleone, 15 Feb 2014

  • sierraleone

    “Powerful message about the strength of all people when we come together! I will continue to share Shannen's story with my students-to inspire, educate and empower. Thank you Shannen for planting the seed; look at how the seed grows. Thank you Cindy Blackstock for your passion and strength-you continue to inspire me!” — sierraleone, 15 Feb 2014

  • DonnaMae

    “I visited Attiwapaskikat in 1987 when I taught in Fort Albany. This film made me very sad that progress was so slow to come. Now in 2014 is the school built & eduction improving? I wish there was an update included. ” — DonnaMae, 15 Feb 2014

  • FrankdeJong

    “I've canoed the James Bay rivers on the Ontario side, and in some communities we toured fabulous new schools but in others, like Attawapisat, two years ago, after years of shameful neglect by the federal government, the construction of the new school was just beginning. ” — FrankdeJong, 15 Feb 2014

  • keb-cvb@sympatico.ca

    “Thanks so much NFB for airing this film this weekend and to Alanis Obomsawin for another amazing creation. Most of all thanks for the wisdom and courage of the young people of First Nations. Carolyn Boyer, 72, Barrie, ON” — keb-cvb@sympatico.ca, 15 Feb 2014

  • Zengarden17

    “Incredibly powerful documentary about a young activist whose work is continued by her family, her community, and MP Charlie Angus who pick up the fight for equitable schooling for FN children across the country. You will understand the importance of youth engagement when you watch this.” — Zengarden17, 15 Feb 2014

  • GingerMcLeanFairford

    “Great work Guys! ” — GingerMcLeanFairford, 13 Feb 2014

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Film Credits

director
Alanis Obomsawin
writer
Alanis Obomsawin
editor
Alison Burns
director of photography
René Sioui Labelle
sound recordist
Glenn Hodgins
animation
David Barlow-Krelina
original music
Alain Auger
narration
Alanis Obomsawin
sound editor
Don Ayer
mix
Jean Paul Vialard
foley
Stéphane Cadotte
research
Alanis Obomsawin
Katherine Kasirer
producer
Alanis Obomsawin

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